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  1. The 5G Revolution

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    What is 5G?

    5G is a major buzzword in the telecommunications industry right now. It’s important to understand this upcoming enhancement because it will change our whole online experience. What exactly is 5G and what impact will it have on technology? By definition, 5G stands for the 5th Generation of wireless technology and it is the successor to what we currently use on our smart devices – 4G or LTE. There will be a plethora of benefits for your smart devices such as: extremely fast speeds, the ability to move more data, lower latency, more responsiveness, and the ability to connect multiple devices at once. The connection speeds will be exponentially faster in comparison to 4G and LTE. It will supposedly have a download speed of an impressive 1 to 10 Gbps compared to a mere 100 Mbps with LTE. That’s fast, and with 5G this will become the standard for the industry around the world.

    What will 5G do?

    While these benefits will enhance our personal device usage, the impact on technology and telecommunications will be transformative. One of these benefits is the ability to perform remote surgery. Low latency of 5G paired with the fact that there will be almost no lag at all will allow surgeons to perform in other rooms through the use of Virtual Reality and a robotic arm. This will enable surgeons, or people of any profession, to use their skills in real time from anywhere in the world. The IoT (Internet of Things) as a whole will benefit, particularly self-driving cars and other autonomous vehicles. Several companies are working on the emerging technology of self-driving cars now, but many people believe they won’t be successful until the implementation of 5G. Instant responses, unlimited coverage, and 5G sensors built around cities will allow for the cars to seamlessly communicate with one another and maneuver urban traffic safely and efficiently. This same concept is also true for drones. Drones are currently being used, but not nearly to their full potential. Through 5G, drones will now be able to share information with one another and send real time data to users, thus unlocking an unlimited amount of different uses.

    When will 5G be available?

    So, when can we expect this exciting change to be implemented? The larger wireless providers will be unveiling the service throughout this year. Multiple companies ran test trials in several different cities in 2017 and plan to launch mobile 5G in a dozen cities across the country by the end of 2018. One company has tested 5G in almost 50 cities already and are promising to have full, nationwide 5G coverage available by 2020. Another important thing to note is the fact that to use 5G, you must have a 5G compatible phone that can handle the huge amounts of data and the instantaneous speeds. Over 18 global device makers have pledged to have their 5G compatible phones on the market by early 2019. However, there are still some finishing touches that need to be done before 5G can become a normal, readily available service. For now, all we can do is prepare ourselves and wait!

  2. IoT and its impact on bandwidth

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    Internet of Things (IoT) refers to the way that more and more physical devices are collecting and exchanging data over the internet. When this data is aggregated and analyzed, IoT represents a tremendous opportunity for improvements in accuracy and efficiency. Currently, IoT is doing a better job collecting data than using it — but its potential is limitless. IoT will have an increasing impact on bandwidth needs it grows.

    IoT includes an incredible array of devices already

    Consumer uses include connected cars, entertainment applications such as gaming, smart TVs and media players, wearable technologies such as FitBits, and a growing assortment of smart home devices. Commercial IoT includes devices used in corporate settings to improve marketing and study consumer habits, control inventory, healthcare and more, while industrial IoT covers manufacturing and utility use. IoT can even assist with the management of critical infrastructure such as bridges, railway tracks, and wind farms by monitoring usage and structural factors.

    IoT is growing

    Experts predict that anywhere from 25 to 50 billion devices will be connected to the internet by 2020. In 2015, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development estimated that a family of four had an average of 10 connected devices, which will increase to 50 by 2022 – and that’s consumer usage alone, without considering the exponential growth of IoT in commercial and industrial settings.

    Current challenges with IoT

    Several challenges exist in the evolution of IoT that threaten to limit its potential, such as security, compatibility, and standards – as well as privacy issues related to how gathered data is used.

    One much-publicized issue with IoT is that many devices are easy for hackers to co-opt into distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks that disable key online services. In a DDoS attack, “botnets” send high volumes of traffic to a specific network. The resulting overload can shut down the network, blocking people from accessing email, websites, online banking and so on. It is crucial that developers of IoT consider and address security issues to help prevent DDoS attacks before consumers lose trust in IoT. It is also important that companies protect their businesses from these DDoS attacks and add a DDoS Mitigation service to their arsenal.

    Implications of IoT for bandwidth

    Many IoT devices operate wirelessly, while others are connected. Most IoT devices use very little bandwidth, but the sheer volume of devices going online means more bandwidth will be needed. As IoT grows, it will be necessary to make sure your network can accommodate these changes.

    The amount of data that IoT devices collect and transmit will increase as the technology continues to develop, which will in turn contribute to the need for increased bandwidth. (For example, when smartphones became capable of transmitting images and streaming video, the need for bandwidth jumped significantly.)

    Consumers expect that bandwidth will always be available at the fastest speeds possible, even as IoT increases demand. Companies like DQE that focus on bandwidth and scalable solutions will be critical as need explodes. Reliability is similarly important, and DQE’s self-healing fiber-optic network offers superior redundancy to automatically detect and redirect in the event of a fiber cut or other interruption.

    Count on DQE to continue to provide scalable, reliable bandwidth solutions for your business as your bandwidth needs grow.

  3. The Rise of E-Commerce

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    The rise of e-commerce has had powerful ripple effects throughout our increasingly digital society. Let’s take a quick look at the growth of e-commerce, and what it means for your business.

    Current e-commerce statistics are eye-popping. According to Big Commerce, almost all Americans (95%) shop online at least once yearly– but 80% of us do so every single month. What’s more, 51% would rather shop online than in person. We’re shopping on the go more and more, too. In 2015, only 40% of all online purchases were made via a mobile phone, a share that will increase to 70% this year.

    Traditional brick-and-mortar stores are suffering as a result – several famous chains have closed in the relatively recent past, and many more have downsized dramatically. This has had a profound effect on real estate market as well, as you might imagine. In 2010, there were 35 million visits to malls, according to the real-estate research firm Cushman and Wakefield. By 2013, there were just 17 million visits. Obviously, it’s significantly more expensive to maintain a physical store than a virtual one — and further, people often shop at physical stores, and then order the item online wherever they can get the best deal.

    Some stores, like Macy’s, J.C. Penney’s (which both recently shuttered multiple locations), Kohl’s, Target, and even Walmart saw double-digit percentage growth in online sales last Christmas. But it remains to be seen whether these retail giants can keep pace with e-commerce giants.

    A side beneficiary of all this e-commerce activity is shipping companies, including the U.S. Postal Service, UPS, and FedEx. Amazon is exploring ways to circumvent these companies with drone delivery service, which is capable of delivering packages weighing five pounds or less to a customer in 30 minutes or faster. However, regulatory changes would have to occur for large-scale drone delivery to be feasible — currently, drones must remain in sight of the operator, and there are privacy issues related to flying drones over private property. But the prospect is tantalizing, and it will be fascinating to see if drone delivery becomes commonplace.

    Further innovations in the world of e-commerce could be related to the Internet of Things, and autonomous agents and things. Connected IoT objects could provide information that then enables businesses to give you personalized offers, while autonomous, self-driving cars deliver the parcels! But warehouse robots are already automating order fulfillment in e-commerce warehouses, increasing efficiency considerably.

    E-commerce is growing 23% per year, so it’s somewhat surprising that 46% of American businesses still don’t have an e-commerce website. If your business is planning to get into e-commerce, there are many different platforms, depending on your needs – everything from internet bazaars like eBay and Etsy designed for individuals to sell a few items, all the way up to enterprise solutions.

    If you sell items in a physical store and want to sell a few of them online, Amazon can list your products even if you don’t have your own e-commerce site. But if you’re ready to invest in your own e-commerce site, a variety of different platforms are available, depending on the size and scale of what you have in mind. Shopify, Big Cartel, 3D Cart, and Woo Commerce are a few of the most common for small to mid-size businesses. Enterprise-level solutions include Intershop, IBM Websphere, and Oracle’s ATG.

    In addition to delivering a superior user experience, an online store must be carefully marketed, integrated with Amazon and Google Shop, and the SEO must be effective. It’s a major challenge to get the word out about a new store – for most, e-commerce is not an “if you build it, they will come” proposition.

    Many factors influence where a customer will choose to shop online. But the three top influencers are price (87%), shipping cost and speed (80%) and discount offers (71%). To be successful, e-commerce sites must feature intuitive navigation, good photography, and ease of checkout with multiple payment options.

    Further, e-commerce sites require significantly more bandwidth than content-only sites. DQE can help by providing scalable bandwidth that keeps your site operating cleanly and quickly, which has a direct impact on sales – site slowness is a top reason shoppers say they would abandon a purchase.

    Reliability is critical. If your site is down, you’re missing potential new customers and turning off returning customers – they will shop somewhere else instead, and won’t return. Count on DQE for scalable, reliable bandwidth solutions to support your growing e-commerce business needs.

  4. Emerging Technologies: Autonomous Agents and Things

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    One of the hottest trends in technology is autonomous agents and things. That nebulous-sounding term is actually quite precise – it’s a technology that takes advanced machine learning a step further, so that it can make complex decisions on its own, or autonomously. This is beyond simple automation, where something happens automatically according to hard-and-fast rules. Instead, autonomous agents and things make reasoned decisions based on multiple factors about the current situation – they choose actions designed to meet a certain goal without the involvement of people.

    Examples include technologies like self-driving cars, advanced robotics, certain computer programs (including some viruses), or even something like a smart thermostat that senses when people are home and when they’re not, as well as other environmental changes, and adjusts accordingly – as opposed to one that is merely automated, running on a pre-programmed schedule.

    This is an emerging technology, but we can see its evolution in technology most of us encounter every day. For example, virtual assistants like Siri (Apple), Cortana (Microsoft) and Now (Google) began as little more than voice recognition search functions, but are now much more sophisticated. In fact, in 2016 Apple announced that it is allowing third-party apps to access Siri, so that users will be able to ask Siri to accomplish tasks such as sending payment or searching images. Eventually the user experience of a smartphone will likely have an autonomous agent as the entire user interface, rather than a screen full of buttons for different applications.

    Autonomous agents and things builds on the Internet of Things, in which devices are connected to the internet so that actionable data can be gathered. But the deluge of data provided by the IoT is becoming so overwhelming that it’s too much for humans to process. That’s where autonomous agents and things comes in — in the autonomous world, many technologies are interconnected and share data, and then act on it without the involvement of people. In fact, we’re now starting to refer to the Internet of Autonomous Things, or IoAT.

    Challenges with the technology

    We’re not close to the point where an autonomous agent could take over the world, as has been depicted in numerous sci-fi movies (2001: A Space Odyssey, or Her). But there are some significant, albeit more pedestrian, challenges to be addressed.

    Data security on the devices themselves is a significant problem, in that data can be easily recovered from decommissioned items such as smartphones – and people upgrade their phones at an extraordinarily rapid rate. And all kinds of IoT devices with capacity for storing and transmitting data are discarded frequently as well.

    But virtual data security is an even more significant issue. As we’ve seen, the IoT is vulnerable to hacks and security breaches. Currently, the most pervasive problem is that devices are inadequately protected by passwords, leaving them open to be recruited into giant, impersonal botnets used in distributed denial of service (DDoS) attacks. But as we move toward the Internet of Automated Things, where decisions are being made based on data collected by these devices, the potential implications of such hacks – either to the devices themselves, or the cloud where the data is stored – could become more directed, and even more serious.

    Furthermore, security issues – perceived as well as actual – might impact the growth of the technology in that they could cause people to distrust automated systems and things. We’ve already seen this effect with the IoT. It will be important for designers of automated consumer goods to learn from the mistakes of the IoT and effectively address security issues early in the technology’s evolution.

    Another potential issue for automated consumer goods is that people might find them too complicated to use. If, for example, consumers pay extra to buy cutting-edge automated thermostats but get frustrated trying to program them, they’ll give up on those advanced features and just use the manual settings – and might think twice before choosing an automated product again. To avoid this, designers will need to pay special attention to the user experience as they roll out new products.

    In the longer-term, liability will become more of an issue as systems become more and more autonomous – in other words, who will be held responsible if the system makes a decision that has harmful consequences? The manufacturer, or the owner of the system? It’s not difficult to imagine a scenario in which an autonomous system makes a decision that truly couldn’t be foreseen, especially as systems become more sophisticated. The regulatory framework will need to evolve along with the technology.

    Current applications of autonomous agents and things

    Computer programs are among the most well-developed applications of autonomous technology right now. For example, sophisticated supply chain management programs are capable of evaluating and reacting to needs such as ordering supplies, scheduling workers and so on without human involvement – going beyond simple automation.

    Driverless technologies are already utilized in cars – for example, cars that can park themselves into tight spaces, or automatically brake when they get too close to another car or object. Evolution of truly driverless cars isn’t far behind — in fact, experts think this is possible by 2021. Ford, Nissan, Google, BMW, General Motors, and Daimler are just a few of the big names working toward this goal. Data security is of particular importance with this potential application, as the implications of hacking could be dangerous or life-threatening.

    The world of autonomous agents and things is ever-changing. Keep up with your business’s advancing bandwidth demands with DQE’s secure fiber optic network services, where scalability is unlimited and customization is key.

  5. Technology/IT Trends for 2017

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    The field of information technology continues to evolve at a dizzying pace! Here are some thoughts on important trends and things to watch for in 2017 – many related to how increasing amounts of data are being used to improve automation and efficiency.

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  6. Is Your Business Prepared for a DDoS Attack?

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    On October 21, the east coast of the United States woke up to find a significant portion of the Internet wasn’t working. Twitter, Etsy, Tumblr, Reddit, PayPal, SoundCloud, Spotify, Amazon, and even the New York Times were among the sites users were having trouble reaching. The culprit was a distributed denial of service (DDoS) attack on Dyn, a New Hampshire-based Internet infrastructure company. The incident was an unusually large attack, and fortunately it was resolved by the end of the day. However, it illustrates why DDoS is one of the biggest threats to Internet security today.

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